Serial Experiments Lain


A review by Rahul Ghosh

Lain Iwakura is the sort of ordinary girl who isn’t much tech savvy in the era of computers but a string of events consequently leads her to get devoured by the world of ‘wired’. So much for a plot summary, for the rest Lain lives up to it’s name as a bonafied mindfuck of a series.

Speaking of a theme or central idea, well Lain doesn’t have one… to be precise the theme is not bound by any single strand of interpretation for what i recon Lain throws at us several dimensions of symbolism, at almost every scene. Most of the time you’ll be just blankly staring at the screen going “What the fuck is happening ?”, yes.. Lain is just Incomprehensible at almost every second, and honestly I wouldn’t recommend watching the series to anyone Well here’s my take on the series : Continue reading

Casshern Sins


casshern coverBack home for vacations at the end of the year, having hit some major shocks in my first semester exams I was in pursuit of refreshments. And well, Vinay  introduced me to this wonderful series.
Casshern Sins is not pretty much what it looks like if you’re seeing this picture for the first time. It is not the usual action adventure shounen-esque series you watch, but a very deep psychological series.

The plot – The world is in ruin. Robots are rusting (dying) everywhere unable to repair themselves. Signs of Human are rarely seen, which ensure their extinction. As despair consumes the heart of everyone there is one who is to blame for all the happenings : Casshern, who killed Luna, the Sun that was named Moon. Struck with amnesia as seen in the beginning of the series, Casshern walks into a journey remembering the sin he committed….

Each episode, for the most part, explores a different aspect of humanity, usually regarding hope and despair. They end up giving away moments of vain hope, enraging emotions transformed into love, rarely having scenes of unfettered rage. The first fair half of episodes are quite dull regarding the number count and how long they tried tried dragging it, makes more reasons to why it isn’t everyone’s cup of tea. Whereas the second explores a mystery about how even the most unlikely chance at life can bring out the ugliest in anyone, the emotional impact creates such unrelenting momentum that these roadblocks do nothing to deter anyone from the end.
Fight scenes, at first it’s not hard to expect a depressing setting with some above average, albeit grizzly, fight scenes. However in the very next moment it turns into an introspective piece, symbolical. Just as how the very emotional depth that can be drawn from a single blue flower (As seen in the series) is uncanny, especially as it becomes an unusual personification of death, and as the glimpse of rust on the cheek of a Robot or the emptiness in their eyes bring out the terror of death as a monster which devours on every being.
In my personal opinion, this is one series hard to categorize. It is stands in it’s own as a masterpiece of artistic integrity. But then again tastes may vary, as this definitely is not everyone’s cup of tea.

P.S. I recommend this to every hardcore Evangelion fan.

8.9/10

Reviewed by Rahul Ghosh

Yokohama Kaidashi Kikou


“Today will be tomorrow’s yesterday”

The time is set in future where rising sea level has flooded most of the costal areas. The story of Alpha Hatseno, an Alpha 7 M2 series robot left by her owner at a countryside coffee shop, she acts fully like a human being running the coffee shop named ‘Cafe Alpha‘. The story surrounds as Alpha is getting in with behind the backdrop of a futuristic country-side Japan. The story begins with Alpha making a shopping trip to Yokohama. Marionette but yet like an elegant woman Alpha’s character is able to captivate the heart of most of the male readers. 

ykkAbout the manga in General, YKK is a ‘mono no aware’, a Japanese concept that awares us of the transience of things and describes beauty. The fragrance of the country side and it’s transcending charm, sober warmth of long scooter ride through desolate streets, a coffee shop in the country side with entertaining customers, the sober country people, scenes like the setting sun and mysterious essence of the ocean gives it a color blooming atmosphere evoking overwhelming feelings of nostalgia, reminding us how time is fleeting.
Ashinano is one of those few mangakas who can make you feel the warmth through his pages, the warmth as if a blurry reminiscence to those days when you were light headed and comfortably numb, those days you still long for, a nostalgia drive. Very much unlike the usual mangas where you find string of events with cliches and other elements to stew it up. This in fact exhibits more the traits of a country novel and short stories, with simple events and colloquial monologues. It is a piece that syncs with readers of all ages though only for people with a certain desire for this warmth. Most amusing part is the characters, how natural they are and able to blend through progressing events with just simple acts and that again captivates the readers, it’s as if the readers can relate them to their daily lives. To say it is as simple as amazing it is.

Recommending it to fans of series like : Wandering Emanon, Yotsubato

9.8/10

Reviewed by Rahul Ghosh

Spring and Chaos


spring and chaos cover

This is the tragic story of one of Japan’s most beloved poets, ‘Kenji Miyazawa’. Born at the end of the 19th Century. Kenji, like many artists, did not receive recognition for his tremendous literary contributions until after his death at the tragically early age of 37. The movie portrays people as cats, a homage to the stories Miyazawa wrote. It doesn’t matter if you don’t know about Kenji Miyazawa, or for the matter of fact anything about Japanese Literature, as director Shoji Kawamori does an admirable job of giving the viewer a sense of who Kenji Miyazawa was by attempting to show the world as he might have seen it, his own perspectives and perceptions. Miyazawa loved the beauty of the world and the science behind it. When something in nature catches his eye, Kenji freezes and intensely writes about what he sees in a notebook while seemingly entranced. At the same time we learn he could be captivated by modern technology as he stares hypnotically at a light bulb as it burns out, Kawamori carefully provides these scenes with the proper stipulations of cinematic artistry. The visuals in conjunction with the narrative are also to be cited. Scenes of starry or cloud-filled skies give way to amazing sequences that explore a sense of something greater in the world and the possibility that Kenji was closer than many of us ever have or ever will be to understanding it. Also, at times the visuals can give way to violent and disturbing images as Kenji wrestles with his inner torment. Spring and Chaos may not be able to turn you into a poetry connoisseur but it will definitely make you lean from the window and view the world a bit differently.

All said, I would recommend people not to look up at Kenji Miyazawa’s biography as of yet before watching this piece, for what I felt that this movie is more entrancing if one is oblivious about the author.

Reviewed by Rahul Ghosh

Neon Genesis Evangelion series


Neon Genesis Evangelion+ NGE “Death and Rebirth” + The End of Evangelion

This series certainly gained my respect and earned me as a fan…After starting as a typical Mecha, it changes a lot till the end…to the point that one can think that they r under a psychological attack and how much your mind can handle both the graphic imagery and the information that’s coming flowing in…and that’s what impressed me the most about it…
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